Tag Archives: Herbs

March: What to do on the allotment

March is here in all its sunny glory in UK and we are thinking about what to do on the allotment.

I love the March sun because it makes grumpy people smile, the lovely spring flowers grow from their deep sleep of winter and allotment holders everywhere get very excited, because its time to sow seeds – Woo hoo!

Our organic seed delivery happened in January from Kings seeds and I have been waiting for that wonderful moment when I get the compost into pots and start planting.

I have been learning about planting by the moon because different plants grow better when they are planted during different phases of the moon. Each of these phases imparts an influence on the way vegetation grows on the planet through the rising and falling of the moisture in the ground and in the plants. – The gardeners calendar

I tell you what, it has made a difference, my courgettes and french beans I planted at 4.30am (this is because I couldn’t sleep not because you have to get up at idiot O’ clock to plant by the moon) have shot up, they are growing so well. This photo was taken 2 weeks after I planted the seeds, I had to re-pot them into bigger pots!

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How to plant a medicinal herb garden

How to plan and plant a medicinal herb garden - www.homesteadlady.com

I discovered this ladies site through a link on fb and I am so glad I did, this post is really long so I only copied over half of it, to read the rest pop over to Homestead Lady.

It really called to me as next year I want to grow loads more herbs and use them in many more ways. All photos and links below are from Homestead lady’s page:

Why would you want to know how to plan and plant a medicinal herb garden?  Well, with more and more of us opting out of the conventional this or that there’s been a rise in interest in gardening in general and growing herbs specifically over the last few years.  Herbs are amazingly useful plants in the landscape, even if you’re not ready to use them medicinally.  Most herbs are really not very difficult to grow, many have lovely flowers and/or interesting foliage and they can easily be integrated into your perennial beds or any traditionally landscaped area.  A lot of herbs grow well in pots, either indoors or outdoors and many are very adaptable to climates and types of soil.  Many, many herbs are basically pest resistant plants, ta-boot!  So, come let’s chat about how to plan and plant this medicinal herb garden you need…

 

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Negativity be gone! How to make sage smudge sticks

Witches kitchen

Today is all about the herbs, gathered from my allotment I have been making sage smudge sticks, putting the dried mint and lemon balm into pots to add to our winter stash and I have been inhaling rosemary to improve my memory and we could all do with some of that! I have also collected some lavender to dry out for baths, lavender bags for christmas presents and to aid a restful nights sleep.

I have used dried sage ( I just hang it in bunches in my kitchen to dry out) for the top 3, the advantages are its ready to use and you don’t have to wait, using fresh sage means you can bind the leaves tighter but you have to hang it up and wait before you can use it which takes longer because its not loose. Read More →

Natural Rose petal toothpaste

So after a day of making smudge sticks and crumbling up and jarring my dried herbs, I was looking on Pinterest for more wonderful things to learn and saw a link about rose petal natural toothpaste, this blew my mind! I have been collecting and drying rose petals all summer and have a jar full, just ready to play with, I followed the link and found so much more, I just had to share it with you!

roses

                                                                              Some gorgeous roses this summer in a local park
Here is part of the blog post by Methow Valley herbs blog:

 

Roses as herbal medicine

It’s easy to fall in love with roses. They offer us beauty and can be an effective source of herbal medicine. This article looks at the many ways we can use roses for our health and beauty. From wild rose salad dressing to decadent facial cream to wild rose petal mead… read on! 

The exotic beauty and alluring smell of roses has enthralled humans for thousands of years. Roses have been found entombed with the ancient Egyptian pharaohs and were highly prized by the Greeks and Romans. 

The Chinese started cultivating roses around 5,000 years ago and in the late 18th century these roses spread to Europe where they were further hybridized.

Josephine, Napoleon’s wife, adored roses and strived to grow every known rose species in her gardens outside of Paris. Many credit her for the popularity of roses today. In the late 18th century Europe the rose was so highly valued it was used as a type of currency.

Wild rose petals about to be infused with honey.
A special treat that is also wonderful for sore throats. Photo belongs to Methow valley blog

What to make with juice pulp

After making my juice this morning, (ginger, lemon, carrot and apple) I looked at all the pulp and thought it a shame it was going into the compost again, I have fed other green pulp to the chickens before but it was a bit zingy, anyhow I popped onto my bestie google and asked the question “what to make with juice pulp”?

A very good website appeared called Vegetarian times and I found this really helpful article:

 

One of the questions I get asked most about juicing is “What can I do with the juice pulp?” Tons of things! Read on for 20 of my favorite uses for leftover juice pulp—and get inspired to reduce your food waste and make fantastic use of healthful fiber.

1. Blend pulp into a smoothie to add fiber.
2. Add to a soup to thicken and boost fiber and nutrient density.
3. Use fruit pulp to make frozen “pulpsicles” or fruit pulp ice.
4. Make a veggie broth by boiling pulp with water, herbs, and spices, then straining.
5. Make a “fruit tea” by boiling fruit pulp with water, adding spices such as cinnamon or ginger, cooling, and then straining.
6. Use veggie pulp to add nutrient density to mac n’ cheese or pasta sauce, or layer into a lasagne.
7. Make fabulous fruit leathers.
9. Use in homemade veggie burgers or fritters. Pulp adds moisture, flavor, and nutrition.
10. Mix pulp into baked goods like muffins, cakes, bread,  dehydrated or baked cookies, and granola bars. Celery, onion, carrot, sweet potato, spinach, apple, and berry all work beautifully.
11. Use fruit or veggie pulp to add flavor, texture, and moisture to pancakes.
12. Make dehydrated pulp crackers.
13. Use pulp for raw pizza crust.
14. Make pulp marmalade.
15. Make a pulp crumble by mixing pulp with fruit and juice, reducing, and then topping with oats, spices, nuts, or seeds.
16. Dehydrate and make trail mix with raw nuts, seeds, and dried fruits.
17. Dehydrate and use like bread crumbs.
18. Use in DIY skincare recipes like scrubs, masks, and soap.
19. Mix pulp into your dog’s food or make dog treats.
If all else fails:
20. Feed it to your chickens, freeze it in ice cube trays to use later, or compost it

 

I ended up adding it to a pan with water, cloves, cardamon, cinnamon, rosemary, thyme, honey and blackberries and turing it into a winter tonic. Thanks for the inspiration Vegetarian Times! Pop over to thier site for more suggestions by readers.

Happy Juicing (P.S. if anyone invents a self cleaning juicer, let me know! )

Healthy eating on a budget

As the prices of things go up a lot more people are being careful of what they spend or even making a choice of putting money on the electric or buying food, it’s all about budgeting and spending wisely, so I want to offer you a series of handy tip and ideas on how to budget and spend a little but still eat healthily, and make conscious ethical choices.

I have heard many times “we can’t afford to eat organic” or “we can’t afford to buy coconut oil at £6 a jar”, I understand this mindset but it is really all about prioritising and finding a way which works for you, you can do you best and that IS good enough for this moment in time, do consider though not only will you be saving money buy not impulse buying when there is nothing left for tea, you will also be making yourself and your family feel healthy and free of disease.

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All about Thyme and how amazing it is!

I love herbs!

I use them in cooking, in remedies, in potions for the bath and skin, I love infusing them in oil and drying them for winter, I have a cracking collection now which has been easy to build up over the past few years. My favourite is always Thyme, this grows year round even when it’s snowing and doesn’t need drying out to store, it’s also very hardy, can last for days without watering even in hot weather, grows well in shade and poor soil too although I like to put my coffee grounds on the soil for an extra boost and comes in all different types, I have lemon thyme ( which hasn’t grown as abundantly as I would like) and English Thyme.

thyme

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Top 4 versatile herbs to grow

We love herbs here at Naked Wild and Free and have a lovely collection growing in our garden but we tend to keep going back again and again to the same few for cooking, medicinal purposes and to use on our bodies, garden and home.

lavender

Herbs are valued for their flavour, scent and healing properties. When you grow your own herbs you will save a lot of money and enjoy the benefits of having them at hand just by your kitchen. They are so versatile too!

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Dandelion an amazing ‘weed’

 

Not only are dandelions great for bees but the are also great to eat in a salad, please don’t class them as ‘weeds’ because they are so much more, you can eat the leaves and the petals, make teas and coffee too.  They are also good for your health as shown in the following post from Homesteadingsurvival.com

dandelion

Dandelion Health Benefits :

1) Cancer: the root extract is unique, and is one of the only things found to help with chronic myelomonocytic Leukemia and It is effective in treating Breast Tumors.

2) Detoxification of vital organs: Because of the diuretic abilities of dandelion root, it is beneficial for flushing out the Liver, Kidneys and Gallbladder. İt works great to purify the blood and cleanse the system. This also makes it a good herb for Fighting İnfections.
It is also used for Arthritis, Osteoarthritis, Gout and Rheumatism.

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