Tag Archives: Garlic

Easy dairy and meat free lasagne recipe

Easy dairy free and meat free lasagne recipe, serves 6.

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You will need:

Packet of lasagne sheets (these can be gluten free if you wish)

Tin chopped tomatoes

Bag of quorn mince (or vegan option could be green lentils)

2 large cloves of garlic

1 onion

Salt, pepper, chilli flakes, paprika, mixed dried herbs such as oregano, thyme, sage, marjoram etc (fresh works great too)

Coconut oil

1 Aubergine

Potatoes

Wild garlic oil ( any flavoured oil would work, even plain olive oil)

Flour, dairy free marg, nutmeg (optional), non dairy milk, kale, garlic clove, coconut oil for the topping and side serving.

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Growing garlic

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“Whole books have been written about garlic, an herb affectionately called “the stinking rose” in light of its numerous therapeutic benefits. A member of the lily or Allium family, which also includes onions and leeks, garlic is rich in a variety of powerful sulfur-containing compounds including thiosulfinates (of which the best known compound is allicin), sulfoxides (among which the best known compound is alliin), and dithiins (in which the most researched compound is ajoene). While these compounds are responsible for garlic’s characteristically pungent odor, they are also the source of many of its health-promoting effects.

More recent research has identified additional sulfur-containing compounds that are responsible for garlic’s star status as a health-supporting food. These sulfur compounds include 1,2-vinyldithiin (1,2-DT), and thiacremonone. The hydrogen sulfide gas (H2S) that can be made from garlic’s sulfides has also been the subject of great research interest. When produced and released from our red blood cells, this H2S gas can help dilate our blood vessels and help keep our blood pressure under control.” Sourced from whfoods.com

I was very sporadic in my garlic planting last year and would like to get with it and grow enough garlic so I don’t have to buy any next year, I did work it out we would need to plant something like 140 bulbs to come anywhere close as we use so much in cooking, at the moment with Tom being on his fodmap diet this number has reduced but I will still need to plant a lot! So with this in mind, I searched for some tips and found this great piece on The Telegraph today:

September is not too early to be thinking about next summer’s garlic crop. Garden centres stock a few varieties, but there is an increasing range available. Order early from a specialist supplier such as thegarlicfarm.co.uk to ensure top-quality seed garlic.

  1. Garlic is easy to grow but needs a period of low temperatures for plants to bulb up. Planting in autumn (October-November) or early spring provides the necessary chilling period.
  2. Choose an open sunny site and well-drained soil or grow in raised beds. Garlic does well on soils manured for a previous crop. Otherwise, add a couple of buckets of manure per sq yd.
  3.  Apply a general fertiliser, such as Growmore, at planting time at 2oz per sq yd (50g per sq m) followed by a light dressing of 1oz sq yd (25g sq m) of sulphate of potash in February.
  4.  Break up the bulb into individual cloves, selecting the largest for planting and using the remainder in the kitchen. Plant an inch deep (slightly deeper on light soils), 6in (15cm) apart with 1ft (30cm) between rows.
  5. On heavy, wet soils, start off garlic in module or cell trays in autumn, overwinter them in a cold frame and plant out in spring.
  6.  Keep garlic weed-free for good yields. In spring, during dry spells, water every 14 days. To reduce fungal diseases water the ground and not the foliage.
  7. As foliage yellows in summer, stop watering.
  8.  Harvest autumn-planted garlic in early summer and spring-planted from mid-summer. Don’t leave them too long in the ground or bulbs will open up, which reduces storage quality. 
  9. Dry bulbs in the sun or greenhouse or a well-ventilated shed for two to four weeks.
  10. Garlic suffers from similar pests and diseases to onions. The most common problem is rust, which can cover foliage in orange pustules. To avoid this, plant into fresh ground each year.

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There are two main types of garlic. Hardnecks produce flower stems and fewer larger cloves of stronger flavour. They rarely store beyond mid-winter. Softnecks store better, autumn plantings lasting to late winter and spring plantings to mid-spring. Elephant garlic is related to leeks. It produces a small number of very large cloves of mild flavour. Best planted in October.

I have been using shop bought garlic to plant and its not really worked very well so I am going to try some bulbs from the seed shop and see how they fare, wish me luck! if you have grown garlic with great success I would love to hear from you.

Fight colds and flu naturally

Before getting to the natural remedies for colds and flu, I want to explain to you how medicine works, let’s say for example you feel full of cold and have a sore throat, runny eyes, mucus etc.
You go and buy a packet of Lemsip to make you feel better.

The packet says:
“For fever, headaches, body aches, blocked nose, sore throat and chesty cough”
Contains Phenylephrine Hydrochloride, Paracetamol, Guaifenesin:

Let’s look at those ingredients:
The primary side effect of phenylephrine is hypertension (high blood pressure) and it can cause increased heart rate
Some patients have been shown to have an upset stomach, severe abdominal cramping, and vomiting issues connected to taking this drug
Side-effects of guaifenesin include nausea, vomiting, formation of kidney stones, diarrhoea, dry mouth, chapped lips and constipation
Paracetamol can cause your stomach to bleed if you take it regularly, liver and kidney damage too.

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